My Backpack (feat. a spoon)

  • MacBook Pro (bought specifically for film editing… also some schoolwork)
  • Beats Headphones (that came with MacBook Pro)
  • Side Converter for Macbook Pro
  • Cord to connect SSD to computer for film editing (usually I’d have my SSD but I didn’t take it over fall break)
  • Random power brick
  • Earbuds that I barely use because I already have Beats
  • 4 mechanical pencils (cause why not)
  • 2 Red/3 Black Pilot G-2 07 pens (I have done all the testing and confirmed that these are the best pens to use… I literally have a pile of 20 of them in my desk drawer)
  • A spoon (not normally there but it was when I took this pic)
  • Deodorant (cause duh)
  • The Best We Could Do (cause I gotta do some work over fall break)
  • My Netflix water bottle (this is actually one of my most prized possessions. I have been using this water bottle for years and I love it with all my heart)
  • My Astrobiology class notebook (cause I have it right after English)
  • Black Backpack (that I’ve been using for the past 3 years… I was just too lazy to get one for college)

Not to sound cliché, but a backpack really does tell a lot about someone. Usually my backpack would also have two SSD’s which I always carry because they have my film footage that I’m constantly editing, but over break I purposely left those at Emory so I could focus on other work/chilling. I did do a bit of cheating to take out some things that are only there because I have to take all of my work with me to fall break, but for some reason I felt the need to include a spoon, despite the fact that this is the first time I’ve ever had a spoon in my backpack. It’s funny and quirky so I thought I might as well leave it in there. I think that typing that catalog of my backpack’s contents is most definitely a form of writing, but I also think that every time you write something it’s a form of writing, it just might not be as “poetic” or “artistic” as other forms. With the personal quippy prompting for this particular list I can get a feel for other’s personality and there is a lot of artistic freedom to do what you want with the assignment. So I would say this is a more narrative building form of writing than one might initially think.

This assignment did make me think. I have been very particular about what I put in my backpack and over the years it has evolved. From types of books to types of pencils. I do, however, keep the same stuff in the same zipper pockets –to the point where I can blindly find any type of object if it’s in my backpack. Everything has a place. Now I just wonder what my backpack will look like in 10 years…

Back to Prompt!

Sweet Goodbyes (Sunday Sketch #5)

Sweet Goodbyes

At first I put way too much thought into this project. I wanted to make something truly artistic and deep and profound. Then I realized I was spending too much time thinking about it so I forced myself to start drawing and make it up from there. Here is my first, and quite frankly frightening, idea:

my first attempt…

For some reason this comic cracked me up. I couldn’t stop laughing. But for another, somehow unclear, reason I didn’t feel it was the right comic for this assignment. So then I settled for the strawberry idea. The main struggle I had was coming up with a quick three beat narrative that told a story. I think this is why I went first to a basic three line joke, and then later allowed the last beat of the comic to not include any words and stand alone as “just” an image. This assignment made me think rhythmically with my storytelling, which was a new experience for my written work. I am constantly thinking about rhythm when it comes to editing film, but usually that can stand separate from the story itself. Here, I was pleasantly challenged to merge the two to craft this stupid joke.

ASSIGNMENT PROMPT

A Reflection Upon Tracing

To pick my pages I went through the methodical practice of randomly flipped through the books until I stumbled upon one that I remember intriguing me when I first read them. From the very first line of tracing I noticed how the panel boxes of Stitches were purposely not drawn perfectly. From then on I did slowly notice some new things about the specific panels. I think it was the slow process of tracing that allowed my mind to grappled with the design of the images better. One major realization for me was when I finished tracing and I looked at how different my Stitches tracing was from the original, and this was because my tracing did not have shadows. This annoyed me so much that I went back through my tracings and added shadows. For some reason the shadows of the scene added so much it felt like I would be misportraying the art if I didn’t include them, and this realization about the shadows ended up in part of my essay.

I found myself naturally thinking of the broad ways I was going to connect the two pages. I actually had an idea for a thesis but forced myself to ignore it and just start writing analytically about one of the pages. This was a hard process, but eventually I got it working. I had to do a lot of revisioning and cutting out because the only way for me to not think about writing to a conclusion was to just write as much analysis as I could. Even still the essay was still pretty long.

My biggest take away was from the analysis of how each author portrayed themselves as powerless. Their different styles influenced their respective scenes, but the way Walden presented hers in a minimalist style while Small presented his in an almost overdramtic lens really showed me how the same feeling can be captured by two different styles.

My Post

Tracing Spinning

Tracing Stitches

Back To Assignment Prompt

A Reflection Upon Tracing

To pick my pages I went through the methodical practice of randomly flipped through the books until I stumbled upon one that I remember intriguing me when I first read them. From the very first line of tracing I noticed how the panel boxes of Stitches were purposely not drawn perfectly. From then on I did slowly notice some new things about the specific panels. I think it was the slow process of tracing that allowed my mind to grappled with the design of the images better. One major realization for me was when I finished tracing and I looked at how different my Stitches tracing was from the original, and this was because my tracing did not have shadows. This annoyed me so much that I went back through my tracings and added shadows. For some reason the shadows of the scene added so much it felt like I would be misportraying the art if I didn’t include them, and this realization about the shadows ended up in part of my essay.

I found myself naturally thinking of the broad ways I was going to connect the two pages. I actually had an idea for a thesis but forced myself to ignore it and just start writing analytically about one of the pages. This was a hard process, but eventually I got it working. I had to do a lot of revisioning and cutting out because the only way for me to not think about writing to a conclusion was to just write as much analysis as I could. Even still the essay was still pretty long.

My biggest take away was from the analysis of how each author portrayed themselves as powerless. Their different styles influenced their respective scenes, but the way Walden presented hers in a minimalist style while Small presented his in an almost overdramtic lens really showed me how the same feeling can be captured by two different styles.

My Post

Tracing Spinning

Tracing Stitches

Back To Assignment Prompt

The Perspective of Perspectives

The first noticeable aspect of the page from ​Stitches​ that a reader picks up on lies within the odd, spurious energy of the doctor. Small crafts this energy by placing an odd shadow that lies directly in the middle of the doctors face for the first two panels. This shadow splits his face directly down the middle, which splits the reader’s attention between the two bright sides of his face where his small, intense eyes reside. Further emphasizing the odd feeling garnered from the doctor, Small slants the angle of his frames, as well as slowly getting closer and closer to him throughout the scene. In contrast, ​Spinning​ presents a much easier image sequence to follow. Walden frames out Tillie’s eyes which places all focus on her tears and slight arm movements throughout the six identically framed panels. This minimalism allows the reader to notice the smallest movements of her arm, or even how she flinches as her mom throws insults at her in the right middle panel. There is no unsettling energy from a doctor or dramatic shifting angles. This comparison makes Walden’s moment of a forced coming out to her mom seem almost tame. InStitches,​ on the other hand, the creepy over-expressive smile of the doctor along with the dramatic framing of each new shot places the reader actively in between the doctor and David. Both pages share a simple two by six paneling, but the dramatization of ​Stitches​ places the reader in the inner fear and disorientation of David as he awakes from his operation, whereas the audience takes on almost an observer’s perspective as they watch Tillie nervously shift in her chair.

The revelation of the dreaded procedure not working and the unfortunate circumstances of Tillie’s coming out are portrayed in violently different lights between Small and Walden. In Stitches​ we only see one panel of David’s static face as he stares with his big eyes at the chatting doctor, whereas in ​Spinning ​we stay locked in on Tillie’s upper left torso for the entirety of the six panels. This difference makes sense when one considers the nature of their problems. When looking at the story as a whole, David faces the external problems of having cancer caused by his father, whereas Tillie faces the internal problem of being her true self to her mother. The focus of their respective pages reflects this contrast. David focuses on the external doctor and the words he has to say, which reflects in the close up canted shots of the doctors face in this stylized lighting. Tillie cannot face her mother with the truth about her sexuality, which reflects in the focus on her shifting arm as that is presumably all Tillie could focus on in that moment. When looking at these moments through the lense of their memories, a clear –and obvious– connection can be made: they are both told from the perspective of the authors. This idea of an auteurist creating a “singular intimacy of one person’s vision of the world across words and images” can be used to great dramatic effect (Chute, 18). With this in mind, one can now consider how the differences in stylistic choices of the panels are actually an artistic choice made by the authors in order to best present their perspectives and memories on the page.

Walden’s minimalism is present throughout her novel, however, there are many ways she could have presented this scene. She presumably chose to use the same basic framing on her shoulder because that was how she remembers the moment. In one of the most dramatic moments of her life she can only focus on how she slightly moves her arm and leans away from her mother. In the moment, this attention to her body position not only reflects the larger narrative of femininity through ice skating, but also acts as a focal point to distract from making eye contact with her mother. David, on the other hand, does not even have the power to look away. The doctor looms over him as he sits helplessly in the static hospital bed. This powerless perspective is reflected in how the majority of the frames are focused on the doctor and his words, whereas all of Walden’s frames focus on Tillie. Despite this difference, Tillie clearly has no power in this situation. She begins the page with her arm crossed over her chest. She lowers it when she affirms her sexuality to her mother, and then when her mother rejects her she raises her arm again and is left in the same defending position at the end of the page as the beginning. When considering these panels with the lens of how each story is told from what the authors memories, the reader can understand how their two positions of powerlessness are similar, despite their varied framing. The panels from each page show very different images, but understanding that each shows the focus of each of the respective author creates the feeling of helplessness that each person shares.